Thursday, May 25, 2006

Kinross Veterans at 60




The KINROSS Swimming & Aquatic Club veterans gathered at the 60th Year Anniversary Celebration.

Note: The Scribe Allister Bartholomeusz & Helen were unable to attend as he was hospitalised in Melbourne.

Sunday, May 21, 2006

Kinross 2 Mile Sea Swim


Kinross 2 Mile Sea Swim

Those in the pic above taken after the two mile sea swim on the beach outside the club are:
L/R: The late Tissa Ariyaratne (KINROSS LEGEND), Aubrey Van Cuylenburg, Tony Fernandez, Chandra Seniviratne, Vijith Kulatunga, Ian Kelly, the late Henry Perera - DIG Police, Desmond Templar.
Seated: Left - Hilmi Khalid, Right - Rattan Managharam
At the rear: Tony Van Starrex

Tuesday, May 16, 2006

Henry Perera

My Very Personal Tribute to Henry Perera.

Henry was one of life's rare 'gentlemen'. Quiet, always unassuming, never pushy and ever prepared to help anyone in whatever way he could. Like so many of my lifelong friends we grew up together under the stern tutelage of Mr.Guy Thiedeman in the College Swimming Pool. No-one had the faintest idea of how to swim back in 1953 - except that is for one Desmond T. - who as anyone will tell you, was the only one blessed with God given natural talent. You either worked hard…or drowned! The choice was all yours.

We spent more time in the water than in the classroom probably. As a result none of us really 'shone' academically. Our early lives were devoted entirely to the College Swimming Team. Henry would surely accept that he was not one of the so called 'stars', but always in the very next row like so many other stalwarts that made the Josephian Swimming Team second to none - always giving 110% and then some more, to bring in those vital points that contributed to making the 'whole far greater than the sum of it's parts'. However, we learnt much more than just how to swim well, although none of us realised it at the time……..what we were instilled with was, the will to succeed, determination whatever the odds, never ever to give up…..giving up is as easy as 'falling of a log', sticking at it is what's really hard, and that 'lesson' above all else, is what we all took away from the College Pool.

We all swam for the one and only Kinross Swimming and Life Saving Club (naturally, with Mr.Thiedeman as our mentor, and I would say, actually our ,'saviour'….) and once again Henry was always there giving his utmost to contribute to the great success that Kinross enjoyed, due in no small part to the army of Josephian swimmers that swelled the ranks of the Club in the early 50's.

Henry joined the Police as a fledgling 'S.I.' and rose right the way to the top, up to the rank of D.I.G. Many thought that he could have gone on to be the I.G., however he suffered a heart attack whilst on horseback as part of his duties as personal bodyguard to the President and came to London for a by-pass operation. Despite being advised not to ride again it was not long before he resumed his former police duties but family pressures and constant advice from friends did eventually(some years later) make him see reason. Due largely to changing political circumstances and having seen enough bitter bloodshed and utter misery in the line of duty to last a lifetime he wisely decided to call it a day and moved away quietly to a much more peaceful life at the Peoples Bank. He was asked to take up his Commission again when the UNP was returned to power a few years ago. He gracefully declined and carried on his work for the Peoples Bank. In addition to his work he acted as Hon. Sec. in his younger years for the C.A.S.A. for 2, if not 3+ years then moved over into the Sri Lankan Olympic Association. He was helping Hamsa (Abdulhussien), who had been chasing Henry for years, to come and work with him at MSH Packaging in Gampaha, when he became unwell.

My wife Margaret and I returned home after a lapse of 25 years in 1985. Petha and Henry were the only two team-mates that had not either 'Burghered Off' to Australia or 'Hit the Trail' to the West…..Petha met us at Katunayake and Henry was our first visitor at the Holiday Inn Hotel that same evening. The next morning a car and chauffeur were at our disposal for a whole fortnight. Two weeks just sped by, visits to College, the Club, Kanate for the 'rellies' etc., etc., and etc., On our last evening Henry suddenly produced an autograph album! Would I please make an entry for him ……Oh Dear! Something profound was called for…..nothing was coming through….Old Captains are supposed to be able to do this sort of thing…..'think…think'! Some 15 years later Henry reminded me of that evening when I had signed his autograph album. Yes of-course I remembered, but no, I did not remember what inspirational 'gem' I had managed to conjure up. He told me that he had fallen back on it many many times, often in tense and demanding situations and had found a deep empathy with the words that had helped sustain him so often. He had even passed it on to younger officers. I felt good….rewarded. Suddenly I knew the quotation before he could enunciate it himself. I too had drawn immense help from it so many times during my own lifetime…..it had said,

"when you can't get the best……..make the best of what you've got".
(Rudyard K)

Then more recently in 2000 Vino his wife, Margaret, Henry and I, were whizzing through the Fort by taxi. Sitting in the front I suddenly asked the driver to swing into Chatham Street so that we could take a last look at the Clock Tower. We were pulled up abruptly at the barrier by an irate looking policeman…….a flow of abuse was heard….Ado! Yakko, cohethe bung yune? This is where we lose our manhood I thought! All those wicked looking guns. All that blood! …..What a waste! Henry then lent casually out of the back window and passed over his old I.D.( he had in fact left the Police Force some 5+ years or more earlier)…..the young policeman looked it over and passed it over to his Sergeant ……both men immediately sprang to attention…….stiff as a poker…..both of them ……..arched slightly backwards with rigidity…..their simultaneous salutes were text book stuff….the barrier was raised and we were waved through……..and all this long after Henry had long left the Force. Here was the perfect example of how well remembered, respected, even revered he was…….and……… by all of us as well …..

In my lifetime there have been just 5, well maybe 6, fine and irreplaceable men to whom I owe a debt I know I can never ever repay. Henry was one of those few………

Farewell dear friend……but not Goodbye.

Tony W. SJC., K.S & L.S.C.,

Hamza Saleem

This article appeared in the 60th Jubilee celebrations of the Kinross Swimming & life saving Club souvenir of 2002.

Kinross Swimming and Life Saving Club – Special People.
1955 Two Mile Swim

“Your scribe believes that the unsung hero of this event was the ever loyal, never says die swim of HAMZA SALEEM. He was stricken by sunstroke and despite the pleas of the crew of the rescue crew to climb aboard he refused to give up -his mission was to complete the swim.

Hamza kept on swimming around and around the Mount Lavania rock, confused, blinded and thinking he was swimming to the finishing line at Mount Lavania Hotel.Guided by the escort canoe Hamza swam ashore completely exhausted to the tumultuous cheers of the crowd.

His performance that day was of raw courage, endurance and typifying the never say die of the SPIRIT OF KINROSS.

Hamza my good friend wherever you are, your swim of that day was that of a true KINROSS CHAMPION and all members of the Club were so proud of you.
We believe it was family pressure that made Hamza give up swimming .He took up to wrestling as a sport became a champion wrestler, following this discipline with courage and determination.

The scribe of the Club-Allister Bartholomeusz, was Hamza’s neighbor and boyhood friend, wrote this article. From the happy community of Mary’s Road Bambalapitiya.

Hamza presently (May 2006) lives with his dear wife and family at Ratmalana in Sri Lanka.

Monday, May 15, 2006

Tissa Ariyaratne


Scattering Ashes of TISSA ARIYARATNE in the sea, opposite Kinross Club, Sunday 22nd June 03’ 12.00 noon.

From today TISSA’s ashes will continue to swim in the company of Mike Sirimanne, Rodney Jonklass and Vicky Athukorale as often as they did together in the sea, that they loved opposite Kinross.


APPRECIATION - June 2003

Tissa was one of my oldest and dearest friends. We met through another dear friend, Ralph Forbes, tragically long dead in a plane crash. It was about 55 years ago, when we were neighbours in Bambalapitiya. Ralph taught us to swim and introduced us to Kinross Swimming and Life Saving Club when we were about 15 years old. This became our second home and led us to manhood under the firm guidance of the Club's "guru" Mike Sirimanne.

Tissa was brave, bold and adventurous. He completed the 2 mile sea swim regularly at Mt Lavinia helping Kinross win the Team trophy on many occasions. In later years he surprised everyone by completing the arduous 6 mile sea swim from Kinross. He was amongst the pioneers with International stalwarts such as Rodney Jonklaas in skin diving and spear fishing. He designed and made an underwater camera from an ordinary Kodak box camera and took the first underwater pictures ever in Sri Lanka. Tissa was a great innovator and he engineered the first spear fishing gun modelled on the Italian “Cernia” of the 1950s. He was the youngest Sri Lankan to own a Harley Davidson motor cycle and it was a thrill to ride with him on this giant and powerful motor bike. He was the first person to row a canoe down the Mahaveli from the hills to Trincomalee. His brother Ubey was the only one brave enough to accompany him.

He was famously nicknamed "Saigon" after the adventure film by that name starring Alan Ladd, which so captivated Tissa. The name stuck such that at public events including the National Surf Life Saving Championships his name as a participant was so announced on the mike.

Tissa was not a big man but he was beautifully athletic in his physique, good looking and extremely fit with very moderate habits. He was gentle, kind hearted and extremely generous to those not so well off, although he was never a wealthy man himself. He never said an unkind word about anyone, was never heated in discussion and could not ever be drawn into an argument, leave alone a fight.

Marriage brought him great happiness and contentment and he was devoted to his wife Ranji and daughter Anoja, and they to him. They were a hospitable family and always good hosts in their home to their numerous Kinross friends visiting from overseas. “Tissa was interested in the The OPERA and classical music. He encouraged his daughter ANOJA to follow a career in music and she rewarded him by having the distinction of being first in the pianoforte exams of the ROYAL COLLEGE OF MUSIC. His great joy was to invite his many friends from overseas to listen to ANOJA’S impromptu musical recitals at his home in Ratmalana.

A few years ago after Mike Sirimanne's death Kinross needed a steady hand at the helm and Tissa gladly came out of retirement to take on the role of President for a good period of time.

Tissa was popular and much loved and it was good to see all of his friends rallying to his support during his distressing and inevitably fatal illness. Tissa greatly appreciated this and found the time to write and give thanks.

Tissa had completed his three score and ten years but in his fit and happy state should have been assured of a longer innings. Fate however is fickle and cruel and called time on him.

His numerous friends in Sri Lanka and around the World are joined in our sadness at his departure and regrets at the loss of a fine man. Our deepest sympathies to his family.

He will be truly missed by the Kinross Brotherhood of the 1950-1960 when the spirit of Kinross “DE PROFUNDIS” was at its greatest.

May he rest in peace.

DR G Kanakaratnam : United Kingdom

On behalf of :-
In Australia: Allister Bartholomeusz, Ron Bartholomeusz, Ian De Zilwa, Carliie Chalon, Ian Kelly, Hildon Bevan, Langston Pereira, Mohammed Fowzi, Bert Van Geyzel, Aubrey Van Cuylenberg, Robert & Maurice Brohier, Vernon De Alwis, Trevor Ebert.

In USA – Randy Grey & Hilmi Khalid IN HONG KONG – Ratten Manahgram

In UK – Vijit Kulatunga, Dr. Sam Samarasekara, Tony Williams, Desmond Templar, Chandra Seneviratne

In Denmark – Tony Fernandez

More Appreciations from across the Globe

Ian Kelly – Australia
Tissa was a great guy in my book a good roll model to all the younger guys of the club, always willing to help out, with his experimental mind he would give anything a go, such as designing his own under water equipment, masks, camera, spears, wearing his specially designed trunks, tied in a not at front, with a jaw like desperate Dan he would walk out of the water with his load of fish and once with an Octopus which we had to soften by dashing it on a rock, that was before we learnt to boil it with a green papaw. He was definitely an adventurer at heart and in actions, like the time he used Mike Sirimanne old canoe to take him through the Mahawali ganga, I believe it was quite a feat. So we do have good memories of our dear friend who has sadly passed away. RIP Tissa we all loved and respected you in our own way.

Tony Williams in Malta
We have been really saddened to read the news that Tissa is no longer with us. What a terrible loss, as you said we all have our special memories of a truly great 'character' - always with a wide smile and a gentle demeanor.

My abiding memory will always be seeing him astride his Harley up by the canal on the Galle Road on a slightly elevated position, and as a special treat allowing us to sit in that great big tractor-like seat...........and then teaching me how to fall of a motor-bike without breaking my neck - hours of falling and rolling 'hand, elbow then an across the shoulders roll' he would insist, on the sands outside the Club House. That guidance and practice has certainly saved my neck more than once.............Goodbye dear friend.

Tony Fernandez in Denmark
THAT WAS REALLY SAD TO HEAR

LIKE MIKE A MAN OF THE SEA. THE OCEAN WAS HIS LIMIT:

MAY HIS SOUL REST IN PEACE.

I HAVE SOME WONDERFUL MEMORIES TOO.

Desmond & Rosmarie Templer – United Kingdom
I am deeply saddened at the passing away of our dear and true friend Tissa.

I always remember Tissa to have a good laugh, even when things were not good. Always helpful and would dive in when the Kinross Club needed someone.

May the GOOD LORD BLESS HIM !

APPRECIATION: Daily Mirror 22 July 2003

Tissa Ariyaratne

I venture to write this appreciation as a most fitting tribute to pay homage to a sage, boss, mentor, friend, a prolific banker and a versatile sportsman. It is with profound grief and shock I learnt of his sudden demise on May 6, 2003.

Tissa was born in the year 1931. He was a native of Matale, and was the youngest in a family of six children. His father was a most respected post master. During Tissa's younger days, the family moved to reside in Colombo, probably as his father may have laid emphasis and priority on education of the children. Tissa' s eldest brother was a medical officer who pre-deceased him at the prime of his age while having established a lucrative a private practice at Mt. Lavinia while another brother was a English lecturer.

Tissa was educated at St.Peter's College, Bambalapitiya which coincidentally was my 'alma mater' too. He excelled in academic studies at college while taking active part in sports and cultural activities. He possessed dynamic skills of water sports, swimming, diving, rowing at outside venues when facilities were not available in college. The college was devoid of the luxury of a swimming pool at that time to Tissa ' s disadvantage.

Immediately after completing his studies successfully he opted for a professional career in banking. He was selected to the Bank of Ceylon in 1951 having all required credentials as a junior clerk at the age of 20. During that era the top management of Bank of Ceylon consisted mostly of competent British nationals.

The standard of work, discipline were at unprecedented high levels. Tissa as a young banker was dedicated and committed to handle difficult tasks entrusted upon him. He was able to adjust to tough challenges in the new environment. He soon became conversant in many areas of banking procedures. He set an example leading from the front by inspiring his subordinates by displaying his outstanding characteristic attributes. He possessed an exemplary character. His charismatic and pragmatic approach together with his pleasing disposition towards all subordinate staff and clients bore ample testimony to the correct approach he adopted to perform duties to perfection. This made his desired mission a resounding success. He was a calm, cool, collected, a composed and a very humble person. He was a very jovial and affable person who always had a pleasing smile. He possessed a marvelous sense of humour. At the time I knew him initially he was one of the rare members of the entire Bank of Ceylon staff who was privileged to travel by one's owns car to office. He married Ranjini Rajawasam, a lady from Ratmalana in the year 1968 and lived at 1st Lane since then. He spent a successful and peaceful family life for nearly 35 years until his demise. His demise was an irreparable loss to his very devoted understanding wife and his only daughter Anoja. Tissa was a dedicated and very caring husband and a father. His wife and daughter cherished his ideals, hobbies and principles. The duo cannot believe that Tissa is no more. I am sure they will take a long time to get over the shock and grief of his loss.


Immediately after completing his studies successfully he opted for a professional career in banking. He was selected to the Bank of Ceylon in 1951 having all required credentials as a junior clerk at the age of 20. During that era the top management of Bank of Ceylon consisted mostly of competent British nationals. The standard of work, discipline were at unprecedented high levels. Tissa as a young banker was dedicated and committed to handle difficult tasks entrusted upon him. He was able to adjust to tough challenges in the new environment. He soon became conversant in many areas of banking procedures.

He set an example leading from the front by inspiring his subordinates by displaying his outstanding characteristic attributes. He possessed an exemplary character. His charismatic and pragmatic approach together with his pleasing disposition towards all subordinate staff and clients bore ample testimony to the correct approach he adopted to perform duties to perfection. This made his desired mission a resounding success.

He was a calm, cool, collected, a composed and a very humble person. He was a very jovial and affable person who always had a pleasing smile. He possessed a marvellous sense of humour. At the time I knew him initially he was one of the rare members of the entire Bank of Ceylon staff who was privileged to travel by one's owns car to office.

He married Ranjini Rajawasam, a lady from Ratmalana in the year 1968 and lived at 1st Lane since then. He spent a successful and peaceful family life for nearly 35 years until his demise. His demise was an irreparable loss to his very devoted understanding wife and his only daughter Anoja. Tissa was a dedicated and very caring husband and a father. His wife and daughter cherished his ideals, hobbies and principles. The duo cannot believe that Tissa is no more. I am sure they will take a long time to get over the shock and grief of his loss.

He served Bank of Ceylon for 40 years up to the year 1991. During his career he held several vital and prestigious positions mostly in the head office contributing the immense skills and knowledge for the institution he loved. At the time of retirement he was the Chief Manager of the Premises Department. He believed in motivation and persuasion rather than compulsion in his own inimitable style. Although he was flexible he never made hollow promises. He realised that in certain areas compromise was not possible. During his long tenure of service he rendered yeoman service for the sheer upliftment of the image of the institution.

Tissa after his retirement from Bank of Ceylon opted to pursue his career in banking at Sampath Bank where his services were welcomed particularly as he was in good health having a sturdy personality and considering his thorough knowledge in banking. He continued his impressive work at Sampath Bank for a further period of 10 years in the loans recovery department until he called it a day after serving in the banking field for 50 long years. Tissa, apart from responsibilities he shouldered during his long successful banking career, was also actively involved in various sports and other extra curricular activities which gave him tremendous satisfaction. These activities enabled him to move out from the strenuous monotonous life as a banker. He was a versatile sportsman from childhood. He excelled in long distance swimming, water polo, rowing and life saving. He was the president of the Kinross Swimming Club for a number of years. He possessed stamina in abundance, one who could swim six miles at a stretch. While at Sampath Bank he trained some employees the art of swimming at his 'alma mater', St Peter's College, swimming pool.

During his long tenure of service he rendered yeoman service for the sheer upliftment of the image of the institution.

Tissa, apart from responsibilities he shouldered during his long successful banking career, was also actively involved in various sports and other extra curricular activities which gave him tremendous satisfaction. These activities enabled him to move out from the strenuous monotonous life as a banker. He was a versatile sportsman from childhood. He excelled in long distance swimming, water polo, rowing and life saving. He was the president of the Kinross Swimming Club for a number of years. He possessed stamina in abundance, one who could swim six miles at a stretch. While at Sampath Bank he trained some employees the art of swimming at his 'alma mater', St Peter's College, swimming pool.

In spite of these interest sin sports activities his main hobbies were, however, classical music, singing, dancing, attending to piano recitals etc. He loved to meet his relatives and friends at wedding receptions, parties and family functions. He was the live wire at these functions. He very enthusiastically lent his talents to any occasion of merry making. The sing song parties will continue but the void left with his demise can never be substituted. His sense of humour coupled with his sharp wit will also be terribly missed.

Tissa Ariyaratne, in spite of all this involvement as a much honored citizen in the thick of sports, social and cultural activities, balanced his day to day life excellently. He also held the prestigious post of Vice President of the Bankers' Association for over three years but opted to get relieved of the responsibilities owing to his recurrent illness during the past two years.

He maintained a sturdy physique having abundant stamina until he acquired a very rare illness diagnosed as Mealo Desplastic Syndrome which is due to deficiency of white cells in the blood stream. A person having this disease is prone to infection. Tissa had a number of blood transfusions at regular intervals. He had at a number of times come back to normal life after treatment. The last time he had unfortunately contacted pneumonia subsequent to a blood transfusion which made him seriously ill. After a couple of days he passed away at the Intensive Care Unit at the Nawaloka hospital.

During his period of illness, close relatives rallied around his beloved wife and daughter. They saw to it that he got the best medical attention. Colossal sums of money were spent to save his life.

A large amount of mourners from all walks of life from different communities paid their last respects at his funarals. Many were not aware that he was ailing from a dreaded decease, as he was back to normal life after a blood transfusion. His large circle of friends who have migrated overseas having seen his obituary notice via Internet have been shocked to learn of his demise. Several sympathy messages from his old pals are still conveyed to his family. During the hour of profound grief to give a sigh of relief to my mentor's grieving wife, Ranjini and daughter Anoja, I am sure from the time you have been acquainted with him, his gentility of manners, sterling character, sporting feats, ideal human characteristics and values bear ample testimony to the high esteem with which he was held in society. This would certainly give you the opportunity to whisper to yourselves, "Weren't we a lucky wife and daughter?" He was a devout Buddhist who practised the precepts of Buddha to perfection. May he attain the supreme bliss of nirvana

Sunil Thenabadu

Tuesday, May 02, 2006

Romance of Colombo's Place Names

by Andrew Scott , Daily News – Sat Jan 5, 2002

Colombo has served the needs of many generations and it has a simple beginning dating back to the colonial era. The very beginning of Colombo dates back to 1505 when the militant Portuguese invaded the island and constructed a fortress in the city. It was primarily due to its strategic position that the invading Portuguese selected Colombo as their capital. Subsequently during the Dutch occupation Colombo was re-structured to serve their aesthetic and military needs.

The British who followed the Dutch took every step to modernize this city and some of their art and architecture could be seen in Colombo as well as in other parts of the country even today.

Colombo has undergone a tremendous change now and this change is reflected everywhere while over the past few years some of the popular place names in Colombo have been replaced with names with a Sri Lankan flavour and before all these names are changed it is worthwhile to probe the history and legends behind at least some of them.

Many of the place names in Colombo such as Queen's Street, Prince Street, Duke Street have a royal flavour and they remind us of the colonial connections we have had.

The bridge which leads into Colombo is called the Kelani Bridge now. Earlier this very same bridge was called Victoria bridge, named after one of Britain's most famous Queens.

Albert Crescent was named after prince Albert and Edinburgh Crescent was named after the first Duke of Edinburgh. Colombo's Queen's Street got its name because the Queen's representative lived there. Not only the British but also the Dutch named some of the places in Colombo after their royalty.

For example Keyzer Street was named after their emperor whom they called 'Kaiser.'There are many places in Colombo named after some of the past English Governors who served here.

These include Maitland Crescent, Paget Place, Barnes Place, Campbell Place, Ward Place and Macarthy Road. Guildford Crescent was also named after a governor. Earlier this was named as Frederick North Road, after the first Governor of Sri Lanka. Later Governor North became the Earl of Guildford and the road was renamed accordingly.

Similarly Rosmead Place was originally called Robinson Street which was named after Governor Hercules Robinson. Later Sir Hercules Robinson became Lord Rosmead and thereby Robinson Street was renamed Rosmead Place. Chalmer's Granaries was named after Sir Robert Chalmers and Manning Town, Manning Place and Manning Market are all linked up with the name of Sir William Manning.

Some of the street names in Colombo take our memories back to the names of some famous road builders and their names have become immortalised in the nation's history.

Dawson street is named after Captain Dawson whose name is perpetuated by Kadugannawa's Dawson tower which has become a permanent landmark on the Colombo Kandy road. Major Skinner, another road builder, has the road past the Technical College named after him. The name of another road builder, Captain William Gregory, is remembered by Gregory's road in Colombo.

Some other road names in Colombo such as Wolvendhall Street, Messenger Street, Korteboam Street, Grandpass and Dam Street take us back to the Dutch period.

The Portuguese too left behind some interesting place names such as Mattakkuliya and Kollupitiya. Mattakkuliya is a Portuguese name which means "where the cooly was killed." Kollupitiya was a great plain where the boys played. It had first been called 'Koan Pitiya' which later became Kollupitiya and during the time of the British occupancy it came to be called 'Colpetty.'

They often gave names of Saints to whom the churches in the vicinity were dedicated. San Sebastian Hill and St. Joseph's Road are examples of these and Milagiriya had the church of Our Lady of Miracles.

During the early days Pettah was a highly residential area and it had many streets shaded by trees. Messenger Street was called 'Rue de Massang' by the Dutch because there were many Massang trees and even today it is called Masang Gas Vidiya. Earlier Dam Street was called 'Damba Street' as Damba trees grew there. Bloemendhal Street meant Vale of Flowers and Korteboam means short trees.

The Beira Lake, one of Colombo's most prominent landmarks, was named by the Dutch after the Dutch engineer Johann de Beer. Pettah too was named by the Dutch and Hulftsdorp was named after the Dutch General Hulft.

It is interesting that nearly every British Governor is remembered by a street or another place name in Colombo. Some of the well-known roads in Cinnamon Gardens which was a fashionable residential area even then was named after Governors Sir Edward Barnes, Sir Robert Horton, Viscount Torrington, Sir Henry Ward, Sir Charles MacCarthy, Sir Hercules Robinson and Sir William Gregory.

However, it is rather surprising to recall that no street or other place has been named after the last three British Governors of Sri Lanka, Sir Andrew Caldecott, Sir Monk Mason Moore and Lord Soulbury. Today it is seen that even though some people like new names there is always a preference for old place names which have a history and a charm of their own.